Text The Times.

Text The Times.

I heard a rumor that a local catering company, an ambulance company, a Christian school and a local radiologist and a businessman and a few other places have purchased kitchen equipment, x-ray machines, medical equipment, furniture and several other things from the Crittenden regional hospital. What I am interested in though is that due to their bankruptcy why would they not be required to put a public notice in the paper for this equipment to be bid on and accept the highest bidder? Addition to this is where did the money go? [ Editor’s Note: Oh, that’s not a rumor. In fact, we bought some chairs, computers and other office- type stuff ourselves]

*** Just when you think the Marion School Board has a backbone. Poof, it turns to jelly.

[ Editor’s Note: I’m going to need some context for this. I have had numerous interactions with the Marion School Board, and I’ve never known them to be overzealous or… is underzealous a word? Anyway, I don’t know the particulars in regard to your text, but if the board did not take the action you were hoping for, it’s possible there were mitigating factors of which you were unaware]

*** Please consider sending a reporter to all school board meetings. These are supposed to be open and informational for all of the public. There are some that want to keep things in the dark. This is NOT how public school meetings are to be conducted. Patrons demand accountability from the administrators and school board members. We need to wake up!!! [ Editor’s Note: I get what you’re saying. I really do, but I’ve had to cover school board meetings myself a few times over the years, and they are simply not worth the hassle.

What I mean is, 90 percent of the time, the only individuals that have any interest in what is happening in that meeting are in that room and the other 10 percent, whatever is happening is happening in an executive session and the press isn’t allowed in the room for those. Example ( I’m not making this up): In 2012, I went to a Marion School Board meeting. I was there because someone was supposed to speak against tearing down the old high school. Following the reading of the minutes, the board immediately went into an expulsion hearing ( executive session).

Then 30 minutes later, they reconvened. There was a motion to accept the minutes and then a disciplinary hearing for an uncertified staff member. Yep, another executive session…

and another 20 minutes standing out in the hallway. Then it was back inside for 15 minutes of budget items. It had been over an hour, and I had exactly zero news to report. There was another half- hour of I- don’t- remember- what, and then, finally… oh that’s right, the guy who was supposed to speak noshowed. I guess what I’m saying is that there might be something worth covering at the school board meetings, but in terms of time vs. news content, it’s simply not worth it.

Both Marion and West Memphis have dedicated PR guys, so if something newsworthy is going on in the district, I’m inclined to count on them to keep us informed. Having said all that, the meetings are, as you stated, open to the public]

*** I’m wondering if Donald Trump will make a good president if elected? [ Editor’s Note: I, like many others, initially viewed Trump’s presidential campaign as a joke. It is clearly not a joke any more. I can’t effectively argue whether or not he would make a “ good” president, because I honestly don’t have any clue, outside building a wall between Mexico and the U. S., what his actual plans are. And I promise it’s not from lack of trying. I will, however, stand by my contention that no Republican is electable in the current political climate. The GOP voter base is not concentrated enough in the larger states ( outside of Texas) to mount enough electoral votes to defeat Hillary Clinton. This is not an endorsement of Clinton, it’s just the math the way I see it.

And that’s assuming the Republican Party all rallies behind a single candidate, and that’s looking pretty iffy these days]

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