Whose job are you doing?

Whose job are you doing?

‘Time in the Word’ By Clayton Adams

Christians rightfully have earned the title of hypocrites. We say one thing and do another. We preach love but are often not willing to listen to others to learn about them and very often refuse to understand a point of view different than ours. I am guilty as charged. Do you judge people? Jesus said, “Do not judge so that you will not be judged.” Most people know this verse from Matthew chapter seven even if they are not Christians.

It is the role of the Holy Spirit of God to convict people of sin – not to condemn people. It is God's role to judge people. It is my job to love people. All too often I find myself trying to swap roles with the Holy Spirit and God.

In Matthew 7:1 and 10:6 Jesus teaches about a very important topic – one we all deal with – judging others. Why does Jesus say – “Do not judge so that you will not be judged” Does Jesus expect us to not judge what we hear, see, experience and think? Does Jesus expect us to not judge the actions and words of others?

As a pastor, many times I have been asked by church folk and strangers for the church to help them – some needed money to pay a bill, some needed food, other's something else. Very rarely did I gave cash – if they needed gas, I met them at a gas station and put gas in the car. If they needed food, I went to the grocery store and bought food and delivered it, if a utility bill needed payment, I went to the utility office, verified the need and paid it. Why go the extra steps to verify the need? Because of what Jesus said, “Behold, I send you out as seep in the midst of wolves; so be shrewd as serpents and innocent as doves.” (Matthew 10:16) Every opportunity to help someone is an educational experience. On the one hand, many will be completely open and honest admitting their mistakes and bad decisions that led to the need – grateful for the help they admit their need. A good many others would get angry and resentful having to answer a few questions to verify the need, a few cursed and ridiculed me for verifying their need. I have come to the conclusion that those who object to verification don't want the help.

Jesus clearly knew and understood that we would have to judge others in this life. He was not forbidding us to judge others, instead He warned us how to judge and when we judge to have a humble heart. Allow me to explain.

If one reads Matthew chapter seven, Jesus does say, “Do not judge so that you will not be judged.” But the rest of chapter seven is Jesus explaining how to apply this command. Jesus clarifies the command “do not judge…” with this warning, “For in the way you judge, you will be judged; and by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you.” (Verse 2) In verses seven through fourteen, Jesus teaches on our need to ask our Father in Heaven for the things we need – He meets our needs and most often uses other people and events to fulfill our needs. We need to trust Him, He will meet our need. Jesus then speaks about judging if a tree is healthy and productive by judging the fruit that is produced. Want to know if an apple tree is healthy? Examine the fruit. Want to know what type of tree it is? Examine the fruit.

Applying the principles Jesus taught into our lives, if you want to know who and what a person is, look at their life, what have they produced? Don't examine what a person says, examine what the person has accomplished. But beware!

Jesus gives two ominous warnings, “for in the way you judge, you will be judged; and by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you.” (Matthew 7:2) How you have judged others – harsh, unforgiving, without grace and mercy or with humility, grace and mercy, is how you will be judged. You choose how you will be judged by God by how you judge others who come into your life.

The second warning, “Not everyone who says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.” (Matthew 7:21) I think this verse shakes me to my core – Jesus said that not everyone who calls Him “Lord” will be in Heaven. Why? Jesus tells us why. “Not everyone who says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.”

Whose job are you doing? The Holy Spirit of God draws people to Himself. God is the judge of all people and you and I are to be loving people. Are you doing the will of the Father? Are you loving people? Loving people requires action. What evidence exists in your life to prove your faith and obedience to Christ?

The scariest verse in the Bible comes from Jesus, “Not everyone who says to Me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter.” (Matthew 7:21) This forces me to stop judging people and do my job, loving people. Whose job are you doing?

Clayton Adams has a message of faith he would like to share with the community. He would also like to hear from you. E- mail him a t claytonpadamslll@ gmail. c om.

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